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National Recovery Month 2018

During the month of September, the Substance Abuse Mental Health Service Administration (SAMHSA) Encourages all alcohol and drug treatment organizations to promote Recovery Month. This increased awareness helps with sharing the understanding of mental and substance use disorders. Recovery Month celebrates the people who recover. The annual theme is Join the Voices for Recovery: Invest in Health, Home, Purpose, and Community.

Summer Sky Treatment Center along with The State of Texas would like first to congratulate all those who are actively living a life of personal recovery. Recovery is an amazing experience and one that all people with alcohol or drug problems should experience. To invest in our personal health by seeking alcohol or drug treatment is the first step in truly investing in health. It all starts with realizing a problem exist and then picking up the phone and reaching out for help. Summer Sky Treatment Center maintains a 24/hour hotline for those looking for alcohol or drug treatment. You can contact them at 1-888-857-8857.

Thousands of men and women have found recovery by attending this alcohol and drug treatment center. They serve that entire State of Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and New Mexico. They are a national alcohol and drug treatment program that offers medical detoxification, Inpatient treatment, residential treatment, and intensive outpatient treatment as well. If you need help for alcohol or drug treatment you can contact Summer Sky Treatment Center at 1-888-857-8857.  

 

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Intervention Services

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Do you or a family member need intervention services? 

One great intervention service that I highly recommend is a place called Stepping Stones Interventions.  With many years of addiction intervention experience Greg Long will be more than happy to help you and your family get the help that is needed.

 

 

 

You can visit his services at http://www.steppingstonesinterventions.com

Stepping Stones Interventions

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Officials fear bath salts becoming the next big drug menace

By Sheila Byrd

FULTON, MISS. - When Neil Brown got high on bath salts, he took his skinning knife and slit his face and stomach repeatedly. Brown survived, but authorities say others haven't been so lucky after snorting, injecting or smoking powders with such innocuous-sounding names as Ivory Snow, Red Dove and Vanilla Sky.

Law enforcement agents and poison control centers say the bath salts, with their complex chemical names, are an emerging menace in several U.S. states where authorities talk of banning their sale. Some say their effects can be as powerful as those of methamphetamine.

From the Deep South to California, emergency calls are being reported over exposure to the stimulants the powders often contain: mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone, also known as MDPV.

Sold under such names as Ivory Wave, Bliss, White Lightning and Hurricane Charlie, the chemicals can cause hallucinations, paranoia, a rapid heart rate and suicidal thoughts, authorities say. In addition to bath salts, the chemicals can be found in plant foods that are sold legally at convenience stores and on the Internet. However, they aren't necessarily being used for the purposes on the label.

Mississippi lawmakers this week began considering a proposal to ban the sale of the powders, and a similar measure is being sought in Kentucky. In Louisiana, the bath salts were outlawed by an emergency order after the state's poison center received more than 125 calls in the last three months of 2010 involving exposure to the chemicals.

In Brown's case, he said he had tried every drug from heroin to crack and was so shaken by terrifying hallucinations that he wrote to one Mississippi paper urging people to stay away from the bath salts.

"I couldn't tell you why I did it," Brown said, pointing to his scars. "The psychological effects are still there."

While Brown survived, sheriff's authorities in one Mississippi county say they believe one woman overdosed on bath salts there. In southern Louisiana, the family of a 21-year-old man says he cut his throat and ended his life with a gunshot. Authorities are investigating whether a man charged with capital murder in the December death of a Tippah County, Miss., sheriff's deputy was under the influence of the bath salts.

The stimulants are not regulated by the Drug Enforcement Administration, but are facing federal scrutiny. Law officers say some of the substances are being shipped from Europe, but origins are still unclear.

Gary Boggs, an executive assistant at the DEA, said there is a lengthy process to restrict these types of designer chemicals, including reviewing the abuse data. But it's a process that can take years.

Mark Ryan, director of Louisiana's poison control center, said he thinks state bans on the chemicals can be effective. He said calls about the salts have dropped sharply since Louisiana banned their sale in January.

Ryan said cathinone, the parent substance of the drugs, comes from a plant grown in Africa and is regulated. He said that MDPV and mephedrone are made in a lab and that they are not regulated because they are not marketed for human consumption. The stimulants affect neurotransmitters in the brain, he said.

The drugs cause "intense cravings," he said. "They'll binge on it three or four days before they show up in an ER. Even though it's a horrible trip, they want to do it again and again."

Ryan said at least 25 states have received calls about exposure, including Nevada and California. He said Louisiana leads with the greatest number of cases at 165, or 48 percent of the U.S. total, followed by Florida with at least 38 calls to its poison center.

Rick Gellar, medical director for the California Poison Control System, said the first call about the substances came in Oct. 5, and a handful of calls have followed since. But he warned: "The only way this won't become a problem in California is if federal regulatory agencies get ahead of the curve. This is a brand-new thing."

In the Midwest, the Missouri Poison Center at Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center in St. Louis received at least 12 calls in the first two weeks of January about teenagers and young adults abusing such chemicals, said Julie Weber, the center's director. The center received eight calls about the powders all of last year.

Richard Sanders, a general practitioner working in Covington, La., said his son, Dickie, snorted some of the bath salts and endured three days of intermittent delirium. Dickie Sanders cut his throat but missed major arteries. As he continued to have visions, his physician father tried to calm him. But the elder Sanders said that as he slept, his son went into another room and shot himself.

"If you could see the contortions on his face. It just made him crazy," Sanders said. He added that the coroner's office confirmed that the chemicals were detected in his son's blood and urine.

Sanders warns that the bath salts are far more dangerous than some of their names imply.

"I think everybody is taking this extremely lightly. As much as we outlawed it in Louisiana, all these kids cross over to Mississippi and buy whatever they want," he said.

A small packet of the chemicals typically costs as little as $20.

In northern Mississippi's Itawamba County, Sheriff Chris Dickinson said his office has handled about 30 encounters with bath-salts users in the past two months alone. He said the problem grew last year in his rural area after a Mississippi law began restricting the sale of pseudoephedrine, a key ingredient in making methamphetamine.

Dickinson said most of the bath-salts users there have been meth addicts and can be dangerous when using them.

"We had a deputy injured a week ago. They were fighting with a guy who thought they were two devils. That's what makes this drug so dangerous," he said.

But Dickinson said the chemicals are legal, leaving him no choice but to slap users just with a charge of disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor.

Kentucky state lawmaker John Tilley said he's moving to block the drug's sale there, preparing a bill for consideration when his legislature convenes shortly. Angry that the powders can be bought legally, he said: "If my 12-year-old can go in a store and buy it, that concerns me."

- Associated Press

To get help for problems with drugs contact Summer Sky Treatment Center at 1-888-857-8857

 

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Addiction

Pre-war Bayer heroin bottle, originally contai...Image via Wikipedia

Addiction is a chronic disorder proposed to be precipitated by a combination of genetic, biological/pharmacological and social factors.

Addiction is a compulsion to repeat a behaviour regardless of its consequences.

A person who is addicted is sometimes called an addict.

Addiction is often characterized by a craving for more of the drug or behavior, increased physiological tolerance to exposure, and withdrawal symptoms in the absence of the stimulus.

Many drugs and behaviours that provide either pleasure or relief from pain pose a risk of addiction or dependency.

For more information about the topic Addiction, read the full article at  Wikipedia.org, or see the following related articles:

Note: This page refers to an article that is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the article  Addiction at Wikipedia.org. See theWikipedia copyright page for more details.

Editor's Note: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

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Children of Alcoholics Likely to become Obese!

Washington (SmartAboutHealth) – According to a new study, children of alcoholics are more likely to face and suffer from obesity than kids who are not born into a family with a history of alcoholism.

The study was carried out by researchers from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri and focused on seeing if there was a link between having a family history of alcohol abuse or alcoholism, and obesity.

Researchers analyzed data that came from two different surveys that involves alcoholism.

The surveys were conducted through the 1990s as well as through the 2000s and involved over 75,000 people in total.

Researchers found that those who had a family history of alcoholism were far more likely to be obese than those who did not.

The belief is that this is due to the fact that the addiction may be passed odwn in the family.

The only difference is that the new entrants into these families are becoming addicted to junk food more than they are addicted to alcohol.

As the years went by in the study, they found that the more recent adults with a family history of alcoholism were more likely to suffer from obesity than those from the early 1990s.

The family history of alcoholism and obesity are more directly linked now because the food that is available today has more calories and more fat than the food some years ago.

Still, the addictive nature between these foods and the brain is similar to the addiction that is seen from alcohol.

The study has been published in the journal Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Getting Sober in Austin, Texas

How do you get sober in Austin Texas? Joining the sober community in Austin, Texas can begin by picking up the phone. Picking up the phone and calling some local recovery resources can do wonders for getting you on the road to recovery.

Do you think your ready to quit drinking or using drugs? 

Have you been making promises to yourself to stop?

Have you had difficulty staying stopped?

Have you had trouble setting a date to stop drinking or taking drugs?

Do you follow through  with your plan to stop?

Have you found yourself worried about your drinking or drug usage?

Do you ever tell yourself that your drinking or drug usage is not that big of a deal?

Do you ever get worried that if you do not stop drinking or doing drugs things are going to get out of control?

Do you consider yourself out of control now?

If you answered yes to anyone of the above questions then picking up the phone and asking for help is most likely a good idea. Many resources exist that can help you better determine if you need help.

 You can contact the local Alcoholics Anonymous intergroup for a listing of AA groups in the Austin area if you have a drinking problem of visit them at this link.   http://www.austinaa.org/

If you are addicted to drugs or think you may be addicted to drugs then going to a  Narcotics Anonymous meeting might be helpful. You can visit them at this link.  http://www.ctana.org/

Do you struggle with a cocaine addiction? If so you might want to go to a Cocaine Anonymous meeting in Austin, Texas. You can visit them at this link. http://www.ca-scta.org/

Addicted to Marijuana? Then a group exist for them at this link. http://www.marijuana-anonymous.org/index.shtml

Addicted to Nicotine? Visit this site in Austin.  http://www.nicotine-anonymous.org/

Dual recovery at this site. http://www.draonline.org/

Heroin Anonymous  http://heroin-anonymous.org/haws/index.html

Crystal Meth Anonymous http://www.crystalmeth.org/

All of the above services are free in Austin. If you are looking for a drug rehab you can visit Sober Sky's link to Texas Treatment or Texas Drug Rehabs on this site. 

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Parents of recovering drug addicts!

Parents of recovering drug addicts have many things in common. They share the struggles of watching their own children struggle with the addiction and if they get the opportunity to see their children seek help, they get to see the daily success of recovery. Often parents of drug addicts share similar experiences and emotions, which in turn creates a bond between parents.

Many parents describe a fear, that their children will die at a young age. Sometimes anger is present because of the addict in their addiction lies so frequently to the parents. The family hopes that recovery will come or better yet that their children will seek help in an addiction treatment facility.

If a relapse occurs anger and frustration can happen all over again, creating despair and hurt feelings. The financial pressures of trying to fix the problem sometimes makes the relapse even more intense. Some families that can afford treatment find themselves going to extremes to help the addict get clean and sober.

Many families do not know that help is available for parents. A program called Nar-Anon Family Groups can help families of addicts. Please visit the site at    http://www.nar-anon.org

 

 

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