Cannabis Use Disorders Feed

Getting Sober in Austin, Texas

How do you get sober in Austin Texas? Joining the sober community in Austin, Texas can begin by picking up the phone. Picking up the phone and calling some local recovery resources can do wonders for getting you on the road to recovery.

Do you think your ready to quit drinking or using drugs? 

Have you been making promises to yourself to stop?

Have you had difficulty staying stopped?

Have you had trouble setting a date to stop drinking or taking drugs?

Do you follow through  with your plan to stop?

Have you found yourself worried about your drinking or drug usage?

Do you ever tell yourself that your drinking or drug usage is not that big of a deal?

Do you ever get worried that if you do not stop drinking or doing drugs things are going to get out of control?

Do you consider yourself out of control now?

If you answered yes to anyone of the above questions then picking up the phone and asking for help is most likely a good idea. Many resources exist that can help you better determine if you need help.

 You can contact the local Alcoholics Anonymous intergroup for a listing of AA groups in the Austin area if you have a drinking problem of visit them at this link.   http://www.austinaa.org/

If you are addicted to drugs or think you may be addicted to drugs then going to a  Narcotics Anonymous meeting might be helpful. You can visit them at this link.  http://www.ctana.org/

Do you struggle with a cocaine addiction? If so you might want to go to a Cocaine Anonymous meeting in Austin, Texas. You can visit them at this link. http://www.ca-scta.org/

Addicted to Marijuana? Then a group exist for them at this link. http://www.marijuana-anonymous.org/index.shtml

Addicted to Nicotine? Visit this site in Austin.  http://www.nicotine-anonymous.org/

Dual recovery at this site. http://www.draonline.org/

Heroin Anonymous  http://heroin-anonymous.org/haws/index.html

Crystal Meth Anonymous http://www.crystalmeth.org/

All of the above services are free in Austin. If you are looking for a drug rehab you can visit Sober Sky's link to Texas Treatment or Texas Drug Rehabs on this site. 

Bestdetoxnow

 

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Arizona voters approve medical marijuana measure - CNN.com

Medical Marijuana Approved in Arizona for medical purposes. Sober Sky is interested in following the research and the progress of how this change will effect the citizens of Arizona. If it is used with strict regulation, I personally see no problem with this change, if the benefits out weigh the other medical procedures. I will have to say "I have some doubts", but it is to early to tell if this is a positive thing or a negative event. I have always seen myself as a forward thinking individual. I hope that as a result of the law change that the doctors are actually required to follow the prescriptions that they prescribe for Marijuana and report into some type of research database. I hope that those that are prescribed the use of Marijuana are also held to strict guidelines not to allow others to have prescribed Marijuana. Lot's of questions, but I will have to wait for the data, as it becomes available. Please visit the CNN article for more details on this development.

 

Arizona voters approve medical marijuana measure

via www.cnn.com


Summer Sky Opens Intensive Outpatient Program in Stephenville, Texas!

Summer Sky Treatment Center in Stephenville, Texas has opened up a State of the Art Intensive Outpatient Program. This New innovative intensive outpatient program is unlike any other program in the State of Texas. Summer Sky has served over 10,000 patients since 1985 and now are positioning themselves to help more people, by providing this service to families and individuals in the Stephenville, Granbury, Glen Rose, Hico, Dublin, Mineral Wells, Weatherford, Eastland, Bluff Dale, Carlton, Lamkin, Morgan Mill, Comanche, Brownwood, Hamilton, Deleon, Lingleville, and Proctor. This is serving a need for the towns and counties surrounding the Summer Sky Treatment Center. No more long drives to the big cities to attend a intensive outpatient program. Many people are going to live as a result of having access to this type of treatment program. You can visit Summer Sky Intensive Outpatient program at http://www.summersky.us or call them at 1-888-857-8857.

 

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Addiction the Word

Some terms that are commonly used in discussing drugs and drug use are difficult to define with precision, partly because they are so widely used for many different purposes. I want to caution people when learning about different addiction related terms. Many different meanings from many different sources use the word addiction to imply explanations of their points of view.  The term Addiction is a controversial and complex term. Another complicating reality is that everyday usage of the word addiction seems to gravitate away from scientific meanings of the word. The history of the word has meant different things throughout the last 200 years.

Who uses the term addiction anyway? The scholars or academic historians have their own opinions and view points to what addiction means. Very interesting points of views have been discussed in the circles of education. The individual addict and the families of the addict all have their own experience with what addiction means to them. Counselors and physicians, nurses, outreach workers, and case managers have their point of views. Then you have judges,lawyers,police officers, probation officers,clergy,child welfare and child protection workers, public health workers, teachers,school counselors, and youth workers who sometimes have their own way of relating the term addiction to what they see in their professions. With so many different views of what the word means it can lead  you in so many different directions when seeking help for someone that has an addiction. No wonder confusion exist for the addiction treatment consumer looking for a great drug or alcohol addiction facility. You are not alone. I hope i can help you find the right facility. Please enjoy the site and feel free to call or e-mail me or better yet post a comment. 

Scott Kelley LCDC

 

 

 

 

 


Alcohol more harmful than heroin or crack

Alcohol more harmful than heroin or crack'

Sacked government drugs adviser David Nutt publishes investigation in Lancet reopening debate on classification

 

Teenagers drinking alcohol

Heroin causes harm to users, but alcohol causes considerably more harm in the wider community, study finds. Photograph: Action Press/Rex Features.

 

Alcohol is the most dangerous drug in the UK by a considerable margin, beating heroin and crack cocaine into second and third place, according to an authoritative study published today which will reopen calls for the drugs classification system to be scrapped and a concerted campaign launched against drink.

Led by the sacked government drugs adviser David Nutt with colleagues from the breakaway Independent Scientific Committee on Drugs, the study says that if drugs were classified on the basis of the harm they do, alcohol would be class A, alongside heroin and crack cocaine.

Today's paper, published by the respected Lancet medical journal, will be seen as a challenge to the government to take on the fraught issue of the relative harms of legal and illegal drugs, which proved politically damaging to Labour.

Nutt was sacked last year by the home secretary at the time, Alan Johnson, for challenging ministers refusal to take the advice of the official Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs, which he chaired. The committee wanted cannabis to remain a class C drug and for ecstasy to be downgraded from class A, arguing that these were less harmful than other drugs. Nutt claimed scientific evidence was overruled for political reasons.

The new paper updates a study carried out by Nutt and others in 2007, which was also published by the Lancet and triggered debate for suggesting that legally available alcohol and tobacco were more dangerous than cannabis and LSD.

Alcohol, in that paper, ranked fifth most dangerous overall. The 2007 paper also called for an overhaul of the drug classification system, but critics disputed the criteria used to rank the drugs and the absence of differential weighting.

Today's study offers a more complex analysis that seeks to address the 2007 criticisms. It examines nine categories of harm that drugs can do to the individual "from death to damage to mental functioning and loss of relationships" and seven types of harm to others. The maximum possible harm score was 100 and the minimum zero.

Overall, alcohol scored 72 – against 55 for heroin and 54 for crack. The most dangerous drugs to their individual users were ranked as heroin, crack and then crystal meth. The most harmful to others were alcohol, heroin and crack in that order.

Nutt told the Guardian the drug classification system needed radical change. "The Misuse of Drugs Act is past its sell-by date and needs to be redone," he said. "We need to rethink how we deal with drugs in the light of these new findings."

For overall harm, the other drugs examined ranked as follows: crystal meth (33), cocaine (27), tobacco (26), amphetamine/speed (23), cannabis (20), GHB (18), benzodiazepines (15), ketamine (15), methadone (13), butane (10), qat (9), ecstasy (9), anabolic steroids (9), LSD (7), buprenorphine (6) and magic mushrooms (5).

The authors write: "Our findings lend support to previous work in the UK and the Netherlands, confirming that the present drug classification systems have little relation to the evidence of harm. They also accord with the conclusions of previous expert reports that aggressively targeting alcohol harm is a valid and necessary public health strategy."

Nutt told the Lancet a new classification system "would depend on what set of harms 'to self or others' you are trying to reduce". He added: "But if you take overall harm, then alcohol, heroin and crack are clearly more harmful than all others, so perhaps drugs with a score of 40 or more could be class A; 39 to 20 class B; 19-10 class C and 10 or under class D." This would result in tobacco being labelled a class B drug alongside cocaine. Cannabis would also just make class B, rather than class C. Ecstasy and LSD would end up in the lowest drug category, D.

He was not suggesting classification was unnecessary: "We do need a classification system – we do need to regulate the ones that are very harmful to individuals like heroin and crack cocaine." But he thought the UK could learn from the Portuguese and Dutch: "They have innovative policies which could reduce criminalisation." Representatives of both countries will be at a summit in London today, called drug science and drug policy: building a consensus, where the study will be presented.

UK reformers will be hoping the coalition government will take a more evidence-based approach to classification and tackling drugs than Labour did. The Liberal Democrats supported Nutt over his sacking, while Conservative leader David Cameron, who got into trouble at Eton, aged 15, for smoking cannabis, acknowledged the Misuse of Drugs Act was not working during his time as an MP on the Home Affairs select committee.

Nutt called for far more effort to be put into reducing harm caused by alcohol, pointing out that its economic costs, as well as the costs to society of addiction and broken families, are very high. Taxation on alcohol is "completely inappropriate", he said – with strong cider, for instance, taxed at a fifth of the rate of wine – and action should particularly target the low cost and promotion of alcohol such as Bacardi breezers to young people.

Don Shenker, the chief executive of Alcohol Concern, said : "What this study and new classification shows is that successive governments have mistakenly focused attention on illicit drugs, whereas the pervading harms from alcohol should have given a far higher priority. Drug misusers are still ten times more likely to receive support for their addiction than alcohol misusers, costing the taxpayer billions in repeat hospital admissions and alcohol related crime. Alcohol misuse has been exacerbated in recent years as government failed to accept the link between cheap prices, higher consumption and resultant harms to individuals and society."

"[The] government should now urgently ensure alcohol is made less affordable and invest in prevention and treatment services to deal with the rise in alcohol dependency that has occurred."

The Home Office said last night: "We have not read the report. This government has just completed an alcohol consultation and will publish a drugs strategy in the coming months."

A Department of Health spokesperson said: "In England, most people drink once a week or less. If you're a women and stick to two to three units a day or a man and drink up to three or four units, you are unlikely to damage your health. The government is determined to prevent alcohol abuse without disadvantaging those who drink sensibly."Two experts from the Amsterdam National Institute for Public Health and the Environment and the Amsterdam Institute for Addiction Research point out in a Lancet commentary the study does not look at multiple drug use, which can make some drugs much more dangerous – such as cocaine or cannabis together with alcohol – but they acknowledge the topic was outside its scope.

They add that because the pattern of recreational drug use changes, the study should be repeated every five or 10 years.

 

 

 

 

 


Summer Sky Treatment Center Houston Texas!

Summer Sky Treatment Center attended the 2010 Spectrum Conference hosted by the Houston Chapter of the Texas Association of Addiction Professionals. This years conference was The Thirty Seventh Annual Conference on Addiction Studies. It is a honor to help support such a great organization and be apart of addiction professionals serving those with substance use disorders across the State of Texas. Summer Sky recently opened up the new Detox Now Program. The Detox now program is created for those who do not want a 30 day stay in treatment, but desire to have detox take place. It is really geared to those who have had previous treatment or have a history of relapse. Please take a look at there website at http://www.summersky.us or call them at 1-888-857-8857.    


Study Contends Pot Isn't a Major 'Gateway Drug

Researchers say ethnicity, stress, unemployment are stronger predictors of hard drug use.

Researchers say ethnicity, stress, unemployment are stronger predictors of hard drug use

FRIDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- A new report casts doubt on the argument that marijuana is a "gateway drug" that plays a major role in leading people to try other illegal drugs.

Researchers found that other factors, such as ethnicity and stress levels, are more likely to predict whether young adults will use other illegal drugs.

Even unemployment appears to be more closely linked to harder illicit drug use than marijuana use, the study authors noted.

"Employment in young adulthood can protect people by 'closing' the marijuana gateway, so over-criminalizing youth marijuana use might create more serious problems if it interferes with later employment opportunities," study co-author Karen Van Gundy, an associate professor of sociology at the University of New Hampshire, said in a university news release.

The researchers based their findings on surveys of 1,286 young adults who attended Miami-area public schools in the 1990s.

Ethnicity was the best predictor of future illegal drug use, the study findings indicated, with whites the most likely to use the drugs, followed by Hispanics and then blacks.

The study findings are published in the September issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

So does early use of marijuana play a role in boosting the likelihood of later drug use? It's unclear.

"This study really doesn't answer the question," said Dr. Richard D. Blondell, director of addictions research at the University at Buffalo (UB), who was not involved in the new study. "As the authors point out, there are a lot of factors at play here. There is no one single answer to why somebody develops addiction."

In a study published recently in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, Blondell and colleagues at UB reported that new research suggests that many people first get addicted to drugs while using prescription painkillers.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has details on drug abuse.

Researchers say ethnicity, stress, unemployment are stronger predictors of hard drug use.


Experts Learning Much About Cannabis-Use Disorders — Psychiatric News

Experts Learning Much About Cannabis-Use Disorders

  1. Jun Yan

Several behavioral strategies have shown effectiveness in helping patients quit cannabis use, and some medications appear to merit further clinical research.

Marijuana is the most widely used illegal substance in the United States, with 15 million or more current users, and approximately 10 percent of these users develop cannabis-use disorders, epidemiological data have shown. The extent of this problem for clinicians was evident at a symposium on cannabis-use disorder, as the session attracted a full house of attendees at APA's annual meeting in New Orleans in May.

It is often difficult to conduct and interpret epidemiological studies of the adverse consequences and risks of marijuana use, David Gorelick, M.D., Ph.D., chief of the Pharmacotherapy Section in the Intramural Research Program at the National Institute for Drug Abuse (NIDA), told the attendees.

The observed outcomes of chronic use are influenced by many factors, including genetic variations, differences in the potency of and cumulative exposure to marjuana use, concurrent use of other substances such as tobacco and alcohol, comorbid psychiatric conditions, and psychosocial risk factors.

Growing evidence supports a link between marijuana use and psychosis, said Gorelick, citing population research from the United Kingdom. The link appears to be particularly strong with early exposure to marijuana in adolescence. Epidemiological research by Stanley Zammit, Ph.D., M.B., of Cardiff University estimated that the effect size of this link translates to this: stopping approximately 3,000 cases of cannnabis-use disorder might prevent one case of schizophrenia.

Research so far has shown no association between in-utero exposure to marijuana and the development of psychotic disorders later in life, according to Gorelick. However, two longitudinal studies using brain imaging found subtle differences in brain activities during executive-function tests between young adults with and without in-utero exposure to marijuana, even though their performance did not differ.

Meanwhile, patients with schizophrenia have reported a high rate of cannabis use—up to 50 percent in some studies, Gorelick noted. Marijuana smoking in these patients is associated with significantly worse psychotic symptoms, poorer treatment compliance, and exacerbated metabolic side effects from antipsychotic medications. “It's clearly bad for them,” he said. “The question is why they use marijuana—and there is no clear answer.”

According to recent research, physical effects of long-term cannabis use are somewhat different from those of tobacco smoking, Gorelick pointed out. Respiratory symptoms such as cough, phlegm, and wheezing have been reported. The association with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lu

via pn.psychiatryonline.org